Sherri Nakashima: A Legacy of Devotion and Perseverance 

Photo Credit: Ana Espinosa

During her 27 years of hard work and dedication, Sherri Nakashima processed over 20,000 credential recommendations for teachers, counselors, administrators and school nurses since being hired in 1997 as Fresno State’s sole Credential Analyst. Without her countless hours of diligence and precise attention to detail, many educators throughout the Valley today would not have obtained the credentials required for them to enter the field of education. As part of her position, she also ensured that all credential programs offered through Fresno State maintained both national and state accreditation by submitting credential recommendations to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) for state licensing of educators.

Nakashima’s journey to this position is paved with a deep devotion for teaching. She graduated from Fresno State as a first-generation college student after being inspired by her two older brothers who both received their degrees in Agriculture. Nakashima obtained a BA in Liberal Studies and also earned a Multiple Subject credential through the Kremen School of Education and Human Development which she then used to teach 4th grade. Soon afterwards, she began to crave a career change. A friend of hers who worked on campus informed her that a position had opened up within the Kremen School. After applying in 1995, she was quickly hired for a front-desk position by Associate Dean Dr. Robert Monke.

“This return to Kremen became a pivotal moment in my life with everything coming full-circle.”

 – Nakashima 

Thea Beddingfield, the Credential Analyst at the time, became her supervisor in Education 100 (now CASS). While working the front desk, Nakashima was also being simultaneously trained by Thea on how to process credential applications. During that period, Fresno State consistently produced the highest number of credential candidates in the CSU system and because of this, Thea was able to convince administration that a second Credential Analyst was needed. After applying in 1997, Nakashima moved to a Credential Analyst I position assisting Thea with processing applications. Shortly thereafter, Thea moved to a different job on campus, leaving behind the world of accreditation. Nakashima then became the sole Credential Analyst for the campus.

The duties of a Credential Analyst are extremely demanding and sometimes even challenging in nature as they are required to remain up-to-date on all credentialing policies and procedures for the state of California. Nakashima was in charge of submitting credential recommendations for all required programs including (Multiple Subject, Single Subject, Education Specialist); Pupil Personnel Services (School Counseling, School Social Work, School Psychology); Administrative Services, Agriculture Specialist, Reading Specialist, School Nursing as well as the online CalState TEACH program.

Her responsibilities also included credential advising, the evaluation of transcripts for adding authorizations, submitting appeals for credential extensions, attending CTC meetings, working with Kremen advisors, program coordinators, and other academic advisors across campus. This frequent communication and collaboration with other colleges at Fresno State was crucial to ensuring that all students met the requirements to earn a credential. Nakashima would also serve as a liaison to local county offices of education, school district human resources personnel, other CSU system Credential Analysts and the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Processing and submitting credential recommendations requires the highest level of attention to detail, something that Nakashima excelled at. Each individual credential candidate’s application entails an evaluation of credential documents to verify that the candidate has successfully met the state and university legal requirements to obtain a credential. Nakashima would double and triple check these requirements to guarantee that the students whom she advised were on the path to ultimate success.

In 2007, Nakashima received a brick on the Teachers and Friends of Education Honor Wall as a Richter Award recipient for outstanding Kremen Staff. In 2019, she accepted yet another outstanding staff award, cementing her legacy within the Kremen School even further.

After 27 years of commitment and resolve within the field of education, Nakashima has decided to file for a well-earned retirement. While she is thrilled to finally be able to turn off her 5:30 a.m. alarm and spend more time with loved ones, Nakashima has discovered that the most difficult part of retiring is the knowledge that she will no longer see her colleagues on a regular basis. However, she is grateful for the cherished memories she has made with her coworkers both in and outside of the Kremen School. She is especially appreciative of the hard work put in by staff and faculty members as well as the presence of invaluable student assistants — the great majority of which have pursued their teaching credentials and/or master’s degrees within the Kremen School.

“I don’t have children of my own, but our current and former student assistants make me feel like a proud “Mom”! It’s heartwarming to see how fellow staff support each other throughout the course of an academic year. They are generous, kind, intelligent, respectful, hard-working and dedicated. All have a wonderful sense of humor, which is needed in dealing with challenges that arise.”

– Nakashima explains.

As she reflects, Nakashima is keenly aware that it wouldn’t have been possible for her to have worked as a Credential Analyst for 27 years without their continued support. She would like to thank the Kremen School administration, staff, and faculty for their encouragement and teamwork over the years. Now begins her next chapter in life!

(Written by Audra Burwell, a Creative Writing student employed by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development )

Faculty Spotlight: Varaxy Yi Borromeo

Varaxy Yi Borromeo

Varaxy Yi Borromeo, an assistant professor in Higher Education Administration and Leadership (HEAL), has been recently selected to receive the 2022 AERA Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans SIG Early Career Award. She also currently serves as the coordinator of the HEAL graduate program and as core faculty in the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership. She was drawn to Fresno State as an institution for several reasons. Firstly, she was born and raised in Modesto, so the institution was close to home. Second, Fresno State is an extremely diverse institution holding both Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institution designations. This is especially important to Varaxy because she desires to work and serve a community that represents both her background and identities. She loves being in a diverse classroom and learning from amazing students, leaders, and professionals. Varaxy has been a faculty member at Fresno State since fall 2018.

Varaxy is constantly being uplifted and supported by an amazing group of mentors, guides, and colleagues. She is extremely grateful to her nominators and co-conspirators, Dr. Jacqueline Mac (Northern Illinois University), Vanessa Na (University of California, San Diego [UCSD]), and Amy Wang (UCSD). She considers them all wonderful souls and has the honor of calling them friends and family. She is also grateful to the SEAAsterScholars Collective of Southeast Asian American (SEAA)-identifying women who are committed to advancing knowledge with and by SEAA members, as well as, her advisor and friend, Dr. Samuel Museus for supporting her work and providing her with the skills and training necessary to contribute important knowledge about Asian American and SEAA communities. She is also thankful for all the Asian American and SEAA elders who provided a foundation for her to be able to advance the work of her community and to her department chair and program colleagues for their support.

            Currently, Varaxy holds bachelor’s degrees in both Business Administration and English (University of the Pacific), a master’s in Library and Information Science (San Jose State University), and a Ph.D. in Higher Education (University of Denver). She teaches graduate-level courses in higher education administration and leadership and in the doctoral program, including contemporary issues in higher education, education reform, and qualitative research. She has learned that it’s not just about doing good work and contributing knowledge but how you do it that matters. Leaning into the collectivist, interdependent ways of knowing and doing that her family taught her has helped Varaxy build meaningful relationships with collaborators and co-conspirators who understand that this work is never meant to be done alone. She resists individualistic ways of thinking and doing and finds great inspiration working with like-minded individuals. When the work is draining, she finds fulfillment in supporting others and receiving support—she knows that she is never alone, something that has made her career fulfilling and joyful.

            Varaxy will be receiving the SIG Early Career Award  at the American Educational Research Association in San Diego, California on April 3, 2022. She states that it is very exciting and spirit-lifting to have her work recognized. As a first-generation Khmer American college graduate and faculty, to be recognized in such a way by her scholar-community is both validating and affirming. She is the first in her family to attend and complete college, thus it has been a journey of navigating unknowns and uncertainties. She is excited that her work is being honored because it also means the effort her family put into coming here as refugees is visible to the world. Varaxy explains how they are the backbone that made this all possible.

She plans to continue conducting research on the experiences of SEAA students via both asset-based ways and utilizing critical theories of race to explore the racialized experiences of SEAA students. Varaxy is also collaborating with colleagues to conduct case studies of three CSU AANAPISIs and the contexts that shape how they support SEAA students. She is especially excited to work with SEAA graduate students interested in similar topics. If there are current SEAA grads interested in research, she is happy to offer training and support. One of her major goals is to build a robust pipeline of SEAA students into higher education and student affairs.

(Written by Audra Burwell, a Creative Writing Student, Employed by The Kremen School of Education and Human Development)

Faculty Spotlight: Soua Xiong

Soua Xiong

Soua Xiong was nominated to receive the 2022 AERA Research on the Education of Asian Pacific Americans SIG Early Career Award. This award is presented to an early career scholar whose program of research has had a significant impact on our understanding of Asian Americans and/or Pacific Islanders in the field of education. A significant impact refers to a program of research and practice that has meaningfully advanced knowledge and understanding in the field. The award will be formally presented to Soua at the SIG Business Meeting which will take place at 6pm on Saturday, April 23rd, at the San Diego Convention Center.

Soua received both his bachelor and master degrees from Fresno State. His BA is in Psychology and his MS is in Counseling. His PhD is in Higher Education and Student Affairs from Claremont Graduate University and San Diego State University. He first ended up at the Kremen School in 2009 as a graduate student, before finishing with his master’s degree in Counseling in 2011. Shortly after that, he was selected as the Graduate Dean’s Medalist for the Kremen School of Education and Human Development. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counselor Education and Rehabilitation and also serves as the Coordinator of the Student Affairs and College Counseling program. He teaches foundations of student services in higher education, applying counseling skills to student affairs practice, and supervises graduate students in the completion of their master’s projects and internships. He has been at Fresno State for over 14 years as a student, staff, and now faculty member.


Soua would like to give a shout out to Dr. J. Luke Wood from San Diego State University and Dr. Song E. Lee from Fresno State. He says that he wouldn’t be where he is at this stage of his academic career without their continued support, guidance, and mentorship. He also would like to include a heartfelt mention of his multiple communities of encouragement. First and foremost, he would like to thank God, followed by his family, friends, and colleagues. He is also eternally grateful to his Department Chair (Dr. Becton), Associate Dean (Dr. Pitt Parker), and Dean (Dr. Randy Yerrick) for their continued support as he coordinates a graduate program as the sole full-time faculty member in addition to all of his other roles and responsibilities as a faculty member.

Being an educator is something that Soua is very passionate about and something he continues to enjoy every single day. He has had the opportunity to prepare and train aspiring student affairs professionals with the counseling training they need to effectively address the holistic needs of college students from diverse backgrounds. What he enjoys most about the teaching experience is the opportunity to learn with and from his students. They bring a wealth of knowledge, background, and experience that greatly enhance the learning environment.

However, Soua’s work doesn’t simply stop inside the classroom. He wants to keep developing a community of scholars committed to advancing our knowledge and understanding of Hmong students in higher education. That is why he created the Xiong Research Group to provide leadership, research mentorship, and monthly capacity-building workshops so that others can learn the academic research process, become critical consumers of research and producers of knowledge on the Hmong college student experience using asset-based frameworks. Currently, his research team (Xiong Research Group) is conducting a national qualitative study to explore the factors that positively shaped the experiences and outcomes of Hmong students in higher education (The Hmong College Student Success Project). Rather than focus on barriers and challenges of Hmong students, this project is a retrospective trajectory analysis using Harper’s (2010) anti-deficit achievement framework to explore factors that allowed them to access, thrive, and succeed in higher education.

He is committed to using his own research to elevate and amplify the voices and experiences of Southeast Asian Americans (SEAAs) in higher education. This strand of his research agenda has focused on 1) engagement of SEAA male students, 2) SEAA community college students, and 3) Hmong students specifically. Rather than use deficit-oriented research approaches and frameworks that perpetuate deficit perspectives and narratives of SEAA students, their community, and culture, he plans to continue using asset-based approaches and frameworks to guide his research in this area of study. After hearing that he would be presented with the Early Career Award, Soua was incredibly honored and even more determined to continue his area of research. He is grateful for the recognition and the progress which his team has made, something that continues driving him toward future success.

(Written by Audra Burwell, a Creative Writing Student, Employed by The Kremen School of Education and Human Development)